Pennsylvania Bridges Summer 2016: Mother, May I?

Spring 2016: Mother, May I?

Spring 2016: Mother, May I?

The Spring 2016 edition of Pennsylvania Bridges“Mother, May I?” – is now available online & in print.

Spring 2016 Edition: Mother, May I?

MomMomA favorite playground game when I was of school age was “Mother, May I?”

For those unfamiliar with this children’s game, the basic objective was to instill both appreciation for authority and foster imaginative thinking.

Speaking of my youth, one of my earliest and fondest memories of my first forays into the wild, wonderful world of publishing was an occasion on which I – along with my high school newspaper sponsor and mentor, Pearl Washington – had to make a difficult choice on the fly.

In a nutshell, our funding was in question, and we had to decide whether or not to send an edition of our paper, The RamPages, to the print shop.

On one hand, we’d already announced to the entire school the paper was due out that week.

On the other, we weren’t sure there was enough money in the school’s budget to cover the printing costs.

Torn, Pearl and I made our choice based on advice she’d received from her own mentor, our high school principal.

“Principal Howard always told me ‘it’s better to beg forgiveness than to ask permission.’ Perhaps this is a case when that rings especially true,” she said, and the decision was made. We sent the issue to the printer.

Fortunately for us, our worst fears weren’t realized, and the check the school cut to the printer cleared.

Fun fact, this adage of it being better to ask for forgiveness than for permission, did not originate with my high school principal but was first stated by the late Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, a U.S. Naval officer and early computer programmer. If you’ve never read her story, look her up. She was a remarkable woman and a pioneer of invention.

“It’s better to beg forgiveness than to ask permission” is a piece of advice that’s lingered with me, and even now, some 20 plus years after Pearl and I took that gamble and shipped off a paper we weren’t sure we could afford, I still find myself on occasion making impulsive choices when I fear an apology may be in order before everything is said and done.

After all, life is a series of choices, some deliberate and others haphazard, and not every decision we make, no matter how well intentioned, is going to be popular with everyone.

Picture how colorless and dull a world we’d occupy if we all made every choice based on how it might be perceived by others.

Think of the innovation that would no longer occur, the questions that would never be asked, the solutions that might never be found. Imagine the revolution that would never happen if we preceded every decision with the query “Mother, May I?”

Sometimes, in order to follow a new path, we must first bypass the gatekeeper.

This edition features a number of people and groups who have elected to take risks, even when the obstacles seemed to outweigh the advantages. Rather than shirking from making difficult choices, they’ve opted in favor of imagination, and of believing the greater good is paramount. Instead of saying “May I?” they’ve said “I can, I may, and I will!”

Until next time, Carla E. Anderton

Winter 2016: Come Fly With Me!

Winter 2016: Come Fly With Me!

Winter 2016: Come Fly With Me!

The Winter 2016 edition, Come Fly With Me! is now available online and in print.

Come Fly With Me!

singing_bars_131602About a month ago, I had a fairly extensive surgery performed on my right foot, the first of four surgeries I will likely need to repair damage to my hands and feet caused by Rheumatoid Arthritis. For the month following the surgery, I was stuck in bed, with my foot elevated slightly over my heart per my surgeon’s post-op instructions, dependent on the kindness of others.

Week after week, day after day, hour after hour, I spent staring at the same four walls, dreaming about the outside world. A blizzard came and I watched it snow on Facebook. Brain rot set in, the kind of mental fatigue that comes from not using your mind to do anything more strenuous than watch TV. I saw so many episodes of HGTV’s Property Brothers I now feel better equipped than Jonathan Silver Scott to identify a load bearing wall. After so long indoors I began to feel as if I would never feel the sun again, like I was trapped like a bird in a cage, and I don’t handle captivity well. Ever read Stephen King’s The Shining, about the guy stuck inside all winter with his family who goes a little, well, nutty? Yeah. It was close.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not asking for sympathy. There are far worse ways to spend time than to lay around being waited on hand and foot. There’s something to be said for taking time off to restore the body and replenish the spirit. I appreciate the fact that it was an option for me and that I have a wonderfully supportive, loving husband and caring, loyal friends who made it possible.

What’s more, though I have a long road ahead of me in terms of needed medical interventions, I’m fortunate to have an army of health professionals dedicated to helping me heal. Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic illness and there’s no cure at this time, but there are medications that keep me mobile and since my diagnosis about a year and a half ago, my quality of life is continuing to improve. Knowing what’s broken, I know what needs fixing.

In a nutshell, I’m one of the lucky ones, with hopes for a healthier future. Once daunting tasks like taking a brisk walk in the woods seem possible. Long stifled and seeming at times even crushed, my wings are beginning to unfold.

Come fly with me in my newfound freedom. Discover the world around you, starting in the pages of this edition with our comprehensive coverage of area restaurants and other attractions. Expand your cultural horizons by catching one of the many musical and theatrical performances listed in this issue, either with a special someone or during your personal “me” time.

If, like me, you’re grateful for the gifts of life and better health, demonstrate your gratitude by getting involved with a worthy cause. Maybe you’ll find one to champion in this issue, or you know of one we should feature in the future. Get in touch.

Come fly with me! Life is ever evolving. Don’t get stuck on the ground.

Until next time, Carla E. Anderton

Holiday 2015 Edition: To All a Good Night!

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Holiday 2015 Edition – “To All a Good Night!”

The Holiday 2015 Edition: To All A Good Night! is now available online & print.

To All a Good Night!

Life's not fair!“It’s not fair.”

How many times have you heard or uttered this phrase?

Log into social media at practically any time of the day and you’ll find a dozen instances of the harsh reality that life isn’t fair. The last month has been particularly momentous and, too often, those momentous occasions have been marked by tragedy. So much sadness and outright ugliness has invaded my Facebook feed that, some days, I actually find myself at a loss for words to combat it.

“Life just isn’t fair,” I think, and reconcile myself to the fact there’s really not much I can do about the poisoned well except refuse to drink from it.

So, I pause before I share that political meme or repost that obviously biased news article. I think twice before I comment on someone’s status update, always asking myself: Is it worth it? Does it matter? What’s the point in alienating friends, family and members of my community simply because I want to have an opinion?

“Life just isn’t fair,” I repeat, and continue scrolling. It’s just easier that way.

Easier, except for the fact that it’s dead wrong. Wrong, because you can’t make a right with two wrongs. Indifference to the knowledge the playing field isn’t level is part of the problem and I, along with every other person who adapts that attitude, am the reason life will continue to be unfair for so many people.

Realizing this, I’ve begun a conscious journey of trying to discover ways I can help make life a little better for others, both in my community and on a more global level. That journey is reflected in the pages of this edition, and it’s a well-worn path to follow, trod by so many others before me.

One major change I’ve made was a fairly quick fix, not to mention an innocuous way for me to make a statement. I’ve started voting with my dollar, and refusing to support companies and organization whose business practices I find reprehensible. Speaking of dollars, I’m also trying to spend mine locally when possible. Sure, I’m just one person, but I believe I can make a difference, even if it’s just by leading by example.

We talked to so many great people for the edition it’s impossible to name them all here. A quick glance at the table of contents reveals no shortage of people trying to restore a sense of fairness to their communities, people seeking to assure everyone has an equal opportunity to experience the “good night” wished for all by Dicken’s Tiny Tim in A Christmas Carol.

“To all a good night,” he exclaims, expressing a sentiment we at Pennsylvania Bridges wish to share with our readers this holiday season. Merry Christmas, and happiest of New Year’s to you and yours.

Until next time,

Carla E. Anderton

What I’m Looking Forward To: The Force Awakens

starwarsShortly after the fall edition was released, I had the honor of being invited to speak to the Publishing the Magazine class at my undergraduate alma mater, California University of Pennsylvania. I spoke briefly on my experiences in the magazine business but most of my talk centered on my passion for the industry. I recalled how during my teens, when most girls were spending their leisure time painting their nails and dreaming of Mr. Right, you’d find me camped out in the family room with a pile of glossy magazines, poring over every word of every article, analyzing every photograph and illustration for meaning.

Fast forward a little over 20 years and I still spend my “free time” devouring magazines. I’m the person who’ll volunteer to accompany a friend to the doctor just so I can hang out in the waiting room and check out what publications the office subscribes to. It was during one of these excursions that I first encountered O, The Oprah Winfrey Magazine.

I know, I know, Oprah’s been a household name for longer than some of our readers have been alive, but this was my first exposure to the publication that bears her name. To say I was impressed would be to downplay my appreciation of this beautifully designed, masterfully edited magazine. I read it cover to cover twice, once to simply absorb it and the second time to take detailed notes on what aspects of it I wanted to emulate here in the pages of Pennsylvania Bridges.

Now, I’m sorry to disappoint, but I didn’t decide in that moment to give all our dear readers a new car. Still, two things struck me that I’ve tried to incorporate in this edition. First is what you’re reading now, the first installment in what I hope to make a regular feature, a piece on something I’m looking forward to. Second is a list stuff we recommend, curated lists of products and services suggested by our readers, our writers and our editors. Want to get in on the fun? Send me an email at carla@pabridges.com.

So, what is it exactly I’m looking forward to as we approach the holiday season? To answer that question, we must travel back in time to the year of my birth, 1977. My arrival into this world was a mere blip in the cosmos compared to the explosion into the universe the same year that was Star Wars: A New Hope.

The first film in the beloved Star Wars series, A New Hope was released in theaters on May 25, 1977. Dubbed an epic space opera, A New Hope was the highest grossing film of all time until the release of E.T., The Extra Terrestrial in 1982.

I didn’t get to see A New Hope in theaters for obvious reasons; I was only a little over three months old. However, my first trip to the movies was to see the sequel, The Empire Strikes Back. The effects were immediate. Han Solo will always be my first love, and I’d be lying if I didn’t say there was something about a guy – Darth Vadar – who can blow up entire planets on command that, well, speaks to me on some level. While I’d like to think I’ve spent my life using the “force” for good, there’s been times the dark side of the force has seemed equally appealing.

Call me a nerd. You won’t be the first. I’m so much of a geek I bought some Star Wars toys for my four-year-old godson and – if he behaves – I’ll let him come over to my house and play with them. I’m currently trying to bribe my husband into buying me the 31-inch Darth Vadar figure for Christmas. (Hint, hint, Eric. I’ve got the perfect spot in my office picked out.)

All kidding aside, for me the Star Wars story is about more than good spacemen versus bad space guys. It’s about the triumph of good over evil, a theme that has resonated throughout history. So, this holiday season, the thing I’m excited about is the arrival in theaters on December 18 of the seventh film in the Star Wars franchise, The Force Awakens. I’m not much of a crowd person so I’ll skip opening night, but come December 19 or 20, you’ll definitely find me firmly planted in a movie theater seat, popcorn in hand, with a wad of hankies for the inevitable flood of happy tears I’ll shed when – after more than 30 years – I’ll get to see Han Solo swagger on to the screen.

Merry Christmas, and May the Force be with you!
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Written by Carla E. Anderton for Pennsylvania Bridges

Fall 2015 Edition is now available!

Fall 2015 Edition - "Not Older. Just Better."

Fall 2015 Edition – “Not Older. Just Better.”

The Fall 2015 edition of Pennsylvania Bridges is now available online & in print.

Not Older. Just Better.

It’s with a heavy heart I sit down to pen my column in this edition. As I was sipping coffee and preparing to wrap up this issue – our biggest yet – I learned via social media my good friend Ron Shannon, whose byline you may have seen in the pages of past issues, has passed away after a short battle with cancer.

I started percolating ideas for what I wanted to say in this space a few weeks ago when my assistant editor, Hayley, and I settled on the cover image and the theme for this edition.

I wanted to mention this issue is all about new and evolving local businesses, and I was planning to pair that information with the fact that we’re celebrating our first birthday as a print publication.

My late grandmother, Eleanor Jean Allen, had a saying about birthdays. “Every birthday is a gift from God,” she’d say when asked if she found her own steady march of years alarming.

She and my grandfather, Carl, were given exactly 65 “gifts from God” before they were tragically taken from us in a tornado in 1996. Nearly 20 years later, I still get a lump in my throat just typing that, but I take comfort in the knowledge my grandparents loved life, and lived every moment of those 65 years to the fullest.

I could share so many memories about my grandparents; they were remarkable people who were loved by many, evidenced by the fact their joint funeral was standing room only. Not only were they cherished by others, their love for each other was obvious in both large and small ways.

Theirs was a love story that began when they were only 12, when my grandfather first noticed my grandmother playing with her dolls on the front porch of her parents’ house. Theirs was a tale of romance punctuated by moments like the time my grandmother had a sweatshirt airbrushed for my grandfather’s 60th birthday that read “Not Older, Just Better.”

Not older, just better, like so many of the people and places featured in this edition. New commercial enterprises melded with stories of people in the process of reinventing themselves. It’s not about the number of years they’ve been established but rather the burst of energy they bring to their respective ventures. It’s about their passion and zest for making their communities better places.

Not older, just better, just as we are at Pennsylvania Bridges. You may have noticed this edition feels slightly heavier in your hands than the last. Over the past year, we’ve steadily increased the number of pages, the quality of the paper we’re printed on, and the scope of our coverage. We’ve welcomed new and veteran contributors and expanded our distribution. Your response, dear readers, has been tremendous, and as we celebrate our first birthday, we’d be remiss if we didn’t say “Thank you!”

In conclusion, however, I’d like to shift focus back to the tragic loss of Ron Shannon. Ron was a terrific guy who always had a kind, encouraging word for everyone. He was also a talented and prolific writer whose books I’m proud to have on my bookshelf. We met as fellow students in the Writing Popular Fiction MFA program and subsequently at alumni events. When my thesis novel, The Heart Absent, was published, he was one of the first people to read it and write a glowing review. When he learned I had started a publication, he was quick to offer to write for it, and never shirked at any assignment. It is to his memory and his spirit I’d like to dedicate this edition. He was my constant cheerleader, and I’m going to miss him so very much.

Until next time, Carla E. Anderton

August/September Edition: Take it Back!

The August/September edition of Pennsylvania Bridges – Take it Back! – is now available online and in print.

Happy reading!