December 2016: Ghosts of Christmas Future

December 2016: Ghosts of Christmas Future

December 2016: Ghosts of Christmas Future

The December 2016 edition of Pennsylvania BridgesGhosts of Christmas Future – is now available online & in print.

Ghosts of Christmas Future

berriesIn our two years publishing Pennsylvania Bridges, I’ve always regretted the fact we never had the opportunity to publish a November issue, given we began as a bi-monthly publication.

A Thanksgiving issue always provides the perfect chance to reflect on all we’ve been grateful for in the past year, and to envision all we might give thanks for in the coming year.

So, this year, I want to express my tremendous appreciation to so many, even as we move into the month of December, because this month I also get to say a special thanks to you, our loyal readers, and also to our talented, dedicated writers and staff.

Before I get carried away with asking folks to come on stage, however, let me take a brief moment to make an exciting announcement.

Beginning this month, we will be publishing Pennsylvania Bridges every month. Yep, you heard it right, and you heard it here first. Every month, we’ll be bringing you the best in arts, entertainment, education, lifestyle and special event coverage in the region. We’ll also be expanding our already extensive coverage of local churches, area non-profits, and other philanthropic organizations geared towards helping others, as well we increasing our front row and behind the scenes presence at area arts and entertainment events.

Got a story? You know how to find us. We’re on the web at pabridges.com, as well as on Facebook & Twitter.

Want us to print your announcement? Let us know.

Like to write? Get in touch. We’re always looking for a few good people. Have a photo you want to share? Let us know.

While we’ll be temporarily cutting back on our page count per issue, we’ll be dramatically increasing our circulation, as well as doubling the number of times we’re printed each year.

What that means is twice the audience for your special event or business, with an edition being produced every month.

Getting back to people I need to thank, however, this issue wouldn’t have been possible without the journalistic efforts of Fred Terling, Assistant Editor and Staff Writer. You’re the best, Tomato.

Technology columnist Eric Worton provided support in the form of [regular] meals, as well as an in-depth report on how to cut the cord using Roku devices to explore the best in entertainment programming.

Reanna Roberts of our exclusive series Exploring the Paranormal gave us a unique perspective on the mental state of that classic Christmas curmudgeon, Ebenezer Scrooge.

Pastor B.T. Gilligan always pens a thought provoking reflection on matters of faith, and this month’s was especially moving. I dare you not to cry reading it. I certainly shed a tear or two.

In short, this issue, like others before it, is jam packed full of goodness.
Based on your feedback, you guys feel the same way. The message is clear: You really like us! Thank you! Keep those letters and emails coming. We pride ourselves on being YOUR paper, and we want to be your voice.

Simply put, as we enter the holidays, I feel so grateful, for our advertisers, for our writers, and for all of you, whether this is your first time reading Pennsylvania Bridges or whether you’re already a loyal fan. Thank you!

As we prepare to celebrate a season with great meaning for so many, I can only hope that we show each other kindness, decency, and the very best of what we can be. Merry Christmas, and Happiest of New Year’s!

See you in January. Until next month,
Carla E. Anderton

Westmoreland College dedicates new lab

ribbon-cutting-not-cutWestmoreland College held a ribbon cutting ceremony to dedicate its new Instructional Design Lab which provides college faculty with the tools to create content engaging course content.

The lab is equipped with six smart podium computers that provide the tools for faculty to imbed video, PowerPoint presentations and other digital content into their online courses delivered in a web conferencing format. These online classes are delivered synchronously allowing instructors and students to interact in real time. Students can access the courses via any mobile device, including smartphones, tablets or computers.

“It’s the closest you can get to being in class without being in an actual classroom, “said Associate Professor John Shelapinsky who teaches Paralegal classes online.

This fall, 47% of Westmoreland students are taking at least one online class and their grade point averages are slightly higher than those enrolled solely in on-ground courses.

“One of our goals is to grow online programs and services to engage students where they are and that’s online, said Westmoreland President Tuesday Stanley. “The Instructional Design Lab will help us to do that.”

Funding for the creation of the Instructional Design Lab was provided by a gift from an anonymous donor.

“We are very grateful to the donor for the gift that enabled us to equip the lab and hire an instructional designer who assists faculty in transitioning their on-ground courses to an online format and developing engaging digital content,” said Stanley.

Funds from a $2.25 million Title III Strengthening Institutions Grant received from the U.S. Department of Education will allow the college to expand the Instructional Design Lab with additional equipment and professional development.

“The lab is the college’s first step in achieving its long-term goal of creating a Learning Commons as part of the Founders Hall renovation project, currently in the planning stage,” said Stanley.

Once completed, the instructional design lab will move to the Learning Commons which will also contain spaces for tutoring and academic support, mentoring and counseling services, career services and an IT help desk.

Westmoreland offers 11 associate degree, diploma and certificate programs that are available 100 percent online. Among those offerings is the Associate of Arts degree, which is transferrable to bachelor’s degree programs at four-year universities. Other programs available completely online are some of Westmoreland’s most popular majors such as business, accounting, criminal justice and psychology.

This fall, Westmoreland was ranked first in Pennsylvania for 2016 online colleges by OnlineColleges.com.

Photo: Delivering remarks at the dedication ceremony were Stanley; Tara Zirkel, dean, Distance Education and Education Centers; Dick Dickert, chairman, Westmoreland board of trustees; Philip McCalister, president, Educational Foundation board; Annette Boyer, director, Distance Education and Learning Resources; John Shelapinsky, associate professor of Paralegal, Business and Real Estate; Ted Kopas, Westmoreland County commissioner; and Chad Amond, president, Westmoreland Chamber of Commerce.

180 Degrees Empowerment Center offers opportunities for area youth

13502588_659102580913805_4113438828867297511_oDepressed areas create despair for residents and youth alike, and a sense that opportunity exists elsewhere. But Terry Vassar of Brownsville, Pennsylvania, decided that he could make it where he lives, and raise others up in the process, through his 180° Empowerment Center, a 501.3c organization headquartered in Brownsville.

Vassar, proud father of five children and a Windows R Us franchise owner, explains the inspiration for the Center’s name: “180 is about making a complete turn-around. Anytime anyone came to Jesus, they would have their life turned around 180 degrees.”

From high school graduation until about age 28, Vassar said that while he had a good family, “…some of us find love in different places, and I found mine in drugs and street life. But at 28, I realized I had no life, and went back to school,” adding that once he rededicated his life to Christ, he didn’t need to go to rehab to quit his habits.

After completing a degree in Ministerial Studies from Shiloh Bible Institute, Vassar worked as a telemarketer where he “ . . . learned how to be a communicator and have people skills,” which benefitted him though managerial and mortgage broker jobs, and would later help bring the Center to the Brownsville community.

14054553_683504928473570_3336914508211999575_oVassar’s experiences on the street, along with personal development through hard work, seeded the idea for 180° Empowerment Center in 2007. However, it took time to build connections with the school district, and create a location, at 165 Market Street in Brownsville. Once in place, he moved ahead with his vision, working with Brownsville Area School District Superintendent Dr. Philip Savini, Jr., Ph. D, to bring the Center’s outreach programs to the district, starting in December of this year.

The Center provides English, math, and Spanish tutoring for 7-12 grades, along with PSSA, SAT, and ACT preparation. In addition, grief counseling, career awareness, student aid workshops, and suicide awareness and prevention programs are available to the area students, or anyone in need.

On request, life development courses and credit counseling are also available.

California University interns from the Department of TRIO and the Hispanic Student Association have stepped in to volunteer their tutoring skills. Lisa Driscoll from the Department of TRIO and Academic Services facilitates the relationship between California University and the Center.

“She’s awesome and it’s been a great partnership. She was instrumental in getting everything in line to start in December,” Vassar said of Driscoll.

Furthering technical literacy skills for Brownsville school district students is Fab Lab, which as Vassar calls “A new, 21st century way of doing design.”

Fab Lab, instructed by Brandon Prentice from Intermediate Unit 1, features classes in Laser Cutting, 3D Printing for Beginners, and a Vinyl Sticker Tutorial. While working through these classes, students learn about design software and 3D modeling to produce projects for the individual class instructions. New Fab Lab classes will form in early 2017.

Vassar’s message for the area is a positive one: “I believe that people in the Mon Valley area, because of the depression, believe they can’t do it here. But by the grace of God, I am. I want kids to be able to duplicate what I’ve done. I want kids to find out what they love to do, and work on developing their strengths.”

Those wishing to donate and/or participate: 180degreesempowerment.com/about, and click on “Lend a Helping Hand.”

Photos: (top) Students show off self portraits made during Fab Lab (bottom) Students participated in a basketball clinic offered by the Center at Brownsville Area High School this past August. Future clinics are planned.

Story by Keren Lee Dreyer for Pennsylvania Bridges

California Holly Days set for Dec. 4

xmas261California Borough families will have the opportunity to partake in a free holiday celebration on Sunday, December 4, 2016 at California University of Pennsylvania’s Natali Student Center from 4-5:30 p.m.

Activities Will Include:

A large inflatable snowman chair for fun photo opportunities

Photobooth Fun – Snap some holiday-themed selfies in the home-made photo booth!

Holiday Crafts

Cal U’s Theater Department will perform a portion of their upcoming musical, “The Happy Elf,” at 4:15 p.m.

Holiday Cookie Decorating

Balloon animals and face painting will be available

A family-friendly holiday movie will continuously be shown in the Vulcan Theater

A card-decorating station will be set-up to decorate cards to send to soldiers and hospitals

Santa will arrive at 4:30 p.m.

Don’t forget your list, and remember to smile for your printed photo with Santa for your decorated frame

Blaze and the DQ ice cream cone will be in attendance

PARKING WILL BE FREE. The best place to park will be behind the Student Union (coming down Hickory Street)

The Bookstore will be running a 20% discount. Plan to have dinner after the event in the Gold Rush, too.

Please invite your friends & spread the word! We hope to see you there!

Event Sponsored by California Borough Recreation Authority and California University of Pennsylvania

Youth reach out to Brownsville homeowners in need

The Brownsville, Pennsylvania area is living in hard times because of diminished industry, diminishing population, and diminished incomes. What follows is an increasing number of decaying homes, with residents wishing for help and hope.

And there is hope. Through the auspices of Reach Mission Trips of Colorado, working in conjunction with Reach Workcamps of St. Peter’s Anglican Church in Uniontown, approximately 350-400 work campers will take up residence at Brownsville Area High School to serve 70 of Brownsville’s homeowners whose homes are in need of vital improvements.

Reach Mission Trips sponsors 6-8 work camps each year, involving church youth group students from 6th grade through high school and adults.

Judith Taylor, coordinator of Reach Workcamps of St. Peter’s Anglican Church, says of the program “It’s almost a rite of passage at church for kids to go to Reach. It’s a way to learn to serve,” which fulfills Reach’s goal of developing youth into “transformed servants of Jesus,” according to their web site.

Homeowners in need are pleased to discover there is no cost to them for the student teams who work to make their home “warmer, safer, and dryer” – the main goals of the home improvements according to Taylor.

“What’s the catch?” homeowners wonder, but there is no catch, as Taylor explains “funds come from youth group fundraisers. Each student usually pays $400 – $425 (to participate). This money funds the needed materials. These kids do fundraisers to raise money to pay for the privilege of sleeping on a classroom floor all week, eating cafeteria food. It’s character building.” Workdays of six hours for junior high, and seven hours for seniors, adds to the week long character building process.

Taylor, an 18 year volunteer, has taken generations of kids to Reach, which helps them learn skills in working with tools, roofing, and painting, while learning work ethics such as getting up for work at 6:30 a.m. every day during the week.

Taylor’s own family is a multi-general participant in Reach, with her daughter, Maggie Taylor, and granddaughter, Bailey Burkett helping out during camps. It’s not unusual for this program to bring in new generations, as Taylor said “A lot of students have come back as adults to continue work. Reach needs staff and now this is their college summer job.”

To qualify for help through Reach, the home must be owned by the resident, have financial need, and be within half hour travel distance from Brownsville Area High School.

In December, a Reach representative will visit homeowners who have completed applications.

All of the work done is overseen by a “troubleshooter” who had been a contractor in the past. All adults are screened including a background check and a letter from their own church’s pastor, Taylor said.

Homeowners benefit in a tangible way from the efforts of Reach work campers, not only in their everyday lives, but in the creation of a positive perception of modern youth. Taylor relates a project in southern West Virginia, where a homeowner “had stairs and handicap ramp so rotted she couldn’t safely leave the house. After being able to go down the steps and view her new porch on the house, she said ‘My porch looks like it belongs on the front of Southern Living Magazine!’”

Homeowners are pleased with the hard work and good attitudes of the campers, and have said “I didn’t think there were any good kids left in the world,” Taylor recounts, adding “the kids lead prayers at lunch time. It changes peoples’ perceptions of youth. I think that’s worthwhile because of too much negativity for young people.”

Taylor invites local community members and churches to participate with donations of bottled water, ice for lunch coolers, donations in kind, or financial donations. Local church youth who wish to participate will not commute, but will stay with other work campers at the high school, as Taylor said, because it provides church youth with a complete work camper experience.

Taylor is available to visit churches and youth groups to explain the camp, and also said “It’s not too early to be looking for homes which need help.”

For questions, information, work the group can do, or offers to help via food, donations, and more, contact Judith Taylor at mumimp@hotmail.com, or call 724-812-1597.

Story by Keren Lee Dreyer for Pennsylvania Bridges

December 2016 events in Brownsville

On Sun., Dec. 4, at 3 p.m. the Uniontown Chorale will present a Christmas program at St. Cecilia’s Church (1571 Grindstone Road, Grindstone).

The Allison Nazarene Church (416 Vernon St., Allison) will host Grace on the Hill on Sun., Dec. 4. The evening of prayer time and Bible Study also includes a free light meal & begins at 5:13 p.m. and lasts until 8 p.m. The public is invited.

Monday, Dec. 5 – Bible Released Time for middle school students at South Brownsville United Methodist Church (412 Second St., Brownsville) at 9 a.m. Volunteers  needed, 724-785-3080.

Thurs., Dec. 8 – Produce to People at the Fayette County Fairgrounds (Fiddler’s Building). Volunteers  needed starting at 8:30 a.m. Food distribution begins at 10 a.m.

On Sun., Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. the Bentworth Ministerial Community Choir will present a Christmas program at St. Peter’s (300 Shaffner Ave., Brownsville).

Monday, Dec. 12 – Bible Released Time for middle school students at South Brownsville United Methodist Church (412 Second St., Brownsville) at 9:00 a.m. Volunteers, call 724-785-3080.

The BAMA meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 13, will be at 9:15 a.m. at the Calvin United Presbyterian Church (307 Spring St., Brownsville).

Thursday, Dec. 15 – Bible Released Time for elementary students begins at 9:15 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church (307 High St., Brownsville). Volunteers needed, 724-785-3080.

Mon., Dec. 19 – Bible Released Time for middle school students at South Brownsville United Methodist Church (412 Second St., Brownsville) at 9 a.m. Volunteers needed, 724-785-3080.

Rock “N’ Remember Live! is back by popular demand

Rock “N’ Remember Live! is back by popular demand!  Spotlight Productions is bringing iconic 60’s groups to the Benedum Center (237 7th St, Pittsburgh, PA 15222) on March 4 at 7:30 p.m. for one night only.

Spotlight Productions has assembled a power packet 60’s show that features legendary groups, Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone, Gary Puckett and The Union Gap, Dennis Tufano, original voice of the Buckinghams, and Terry Sylvester of The Hollies.

“This year’s Rock ‘N’ Remember Live! show consists of all original lead singers of the 60’s, who topped the charts with over 30 top 20 hits,” shared Charlie Pappas of Spotlight Productions. “It has been years since all of these headliners have played in Pittsburgh and audiences are essentially getting four great shows in one!”

peter-noone-highest-resHerman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone: Peter (Herman) Noone, born in Manchester, England has been delighting audiences all of his life. At the age of 15, Peter achieved international fame as lead singer of the legendary 60’s pop group, Herman’s Hermits. His classic hits include: I’m Into Something Good, Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter, I’m Henry the VIII I Am, Silhouettes, Can’t You Hear My Heartbeat, Just A Little Bit Better, Kind of a Hush, A Must to Avoid, Listen People, The End of the World and Dandy. Accompanied by his band, Herman’s Hermits’ Peter Noone consistently plays to sold-out venue’s the world over.

gary-puckett-splash_0x0_acf_croppedGary Puckett and the Union Gap: Gary Puckett and the Union Gap was one of the most successful musical groups of the 60’s. Gary’s distinct signature voice garnered six consecutive gold records and top ten billboard hits with titles, Young Girl, Woman Woman, Lady Will Power, This Girl’s A Woman Now, Keep the Customer Satisfied and Don’t Give Into Him. Gary and the Union Gap have performed on more than thirty television shows and prime time specials as well as a command performance for the President and Prince Charles at the White House. Gary was raised in Yakima, Washington near the City of Union Gap and now resides in Clearwater FL.

dennis-tufano-promo-picDennis Tufano, Voice of The Buckinghams: Dennis Tufano, a native of Chicago is the original voice of the 60’s pop group, The Buckinghams. With the voice of Dennis, The Buckinghams went on to score five major hits which include Kind of a Drag, Don’t You Care, Hey Baby They’re Playing Our Song, Mercy Mercy Mercy and Susan. Dennis who now lives in Los Angeles continues to tour and astound audiences around the country with that unmistakable voice of his.

terry-sylvesterTerry Sylvester of The Hollies: Terry Sylvester started his musical career at the famous “Cavern Club” in Liverpool, England in the early 60’s with his first group “The Escorts” and appeared at the Cavern Club with the Beatles on many occasions. In 1965, Terry joined the Swinging Blue Jeans. Terry got his big break in December 1968 when he was asked to replace Graham Nash of the Hollies. The Hollies scored a string of top 20 hits including  Bus Stop, Stop Stop Stop, On a Carousel, Carrie Anne, He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother, Long Cool Woman and The Air I Breath. In 2010 Terry was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and is only the 5th Liverpool born to enter the hall. The other four are the Beatles. Terry is still touring, mainly in North America.

Tickets (starting at $39.00) go on sale today, Wednesday, November 2, and may be purchased at the Theatre Square Box Office (655 Penn Avenue, Downtown) by calling 412-456-6666 or online at TrustArts.org.

Westmoreland College named top culinary school

2094_chefs_hat_character_running_with_tray_of_wine_and_plate_with_chickenWestmoreland County Community College is ranked the top culinary school in Pennsylvania by Best Choice Schools.

Criteria for the rankings included availability of hands-on experience, internship/externship opportunities, student operated restaurants, modern facilities, industry reputation and national accreditation by the American Culinary Federation.

Nationally, Westmoreland is ranked 40th among the top U.S. culinary schools. Westmoreland offerings acknowledged in the rankings include the associate in applied science degree programs in Baking and Pastry, Culinary Arts and Restaurant/Culinary Management.

“We’re thrilled to be recognized as the best culinary arts school in the state and among the top institutions in the country,” said Dr. Cindy Komarinski, dean of the School of Health Professions and the School of Culinary Arts and Hospitality.

“Our program graduates are employed throughout the United States at places such as Canyon Ranch in Las Vegas, The  Sheraton Grand, Phoenix and Universal Studios in Florida,” Komarinski said.

Within the region, Westmoreland culinary arts and hospitality graduates hold positions as executive chefs, operations managers and product development directors at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort and Spa, The Duquesne Club, Eat n’

Park Hospitality Group and Seven Springs Mountain Resort among other businesses.

Westmoreland is accepting applications for admission into the culinary arts and hospitality programs.

FMI: wccc.edu/culinary.

Waynesburg U named to Community Service Honor Roll

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) recently announced that Waynesburg University was named to the 2015 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. This is the University’s eighth consecutive year receiving the honor. Waynesburg University was one of 115 schools on the General Community Service Honor Roll with distinction and only one of 12 in the state of Pennsylvania identified with distinction.

“We are honored to receive this award, which is a tribute to the hard work and commitment of our students, faculty and staff,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. “Their dedication to service continues to have a profound impact.”

The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to community, service-learning and civic engagement. CNCS is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering.

The Honor Roll recognizes institutions of higher education that support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of effective practices in campus community partnerships. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovativeness of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service and the extent to which academic service-learning courses are offered.

Waynesburg University students, faculty and staff contribute more than 50,000 service hours annually. Through its more than 50 local and regional agencies and a continuously expanding network of international agencies, Waynesburg University encourages students to become servant-leaders through a number of partnerships. The University offers approximately 16 service mission trips each academic year. The trips are held during the fall, winter, spring and summer breaks. The University also participates in a number of weekend-long service projects in the local community and surrounding region. In addition to volunteer hours, the University offers a service leadership minor constructed around service-learning courses. During the semester-long courses, students perform a set amount of hours of community service with a non-profit organization.

The University is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar Schools in the country. With support from the Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, Waynesburg is committed to the program which was created to offer scholarship assistance to students performing significant amounts of community service throughout their time at Waynesburg. Approximately 60 Waynesburg University students are involved with the program each year.